Hello all, I thought it would be interesting to read people's thoughts on ideal bass drum mic placement for optimal sound. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it. This Mic Placement Guide can be used as a starting set-up no matter how big the room is or if you are indoor or outdoor. I first pointed the mic directly at the beater impact point, but I wasnt getting as much boom as I was hoping for. If the kick drum has a hole in the front head, interior placement is an easy way to capture a punchy and consistent kick drum sound. Literally 6-7 months ago. I usually run a reso-ported 22" Gretsch RN 2 kick with an AKG D112 mounted on a Kelly Shu, either pointed dead ahead toward the point of … Don't try to make the kick sound all modern and punchy and huge, with no hole the sound will be fat and warm and your mic in front of that with a little EQ and gate into a decent sound system will work just fine. Placed 3 ” up-just off the edge-tilted towards the Center. Some people choose […] Your email address will not be published. Most people setting up sound for a bar band drummer don't want to fiddle around with perfect mic placement and figuring out how to eq the kick for "that sound". This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. (The only bass drum mic I had at that point.) In this case, the drummer can either choose to have a mic permanently installed inside the bass drum or live with the reduced attack by miking the bass drum from the outside. Start here. I usually run a reso-ported 22" Gretsch RN 2 kick with an AKG D112 mounted on a Kelly Shu, either pointed dead ahead toward … The noise-masking acoustic diffusion you get in the best live venues lets you get away with all kinds of tricks, from extreme EQing to dynamics processing that would sound awful on a studio album. I think it gives a good mix of fullness and articulation, but then again our PA speakers are fairly small and we don't carry separate subs, so that's probably a factor as well. The D6 makes a pleasing sound easily on nearly any kick drum and it isn't picky about placement making it a "good" choice for many applications. Great response Hater. Moving the mic on the snare can be the solution if you are hearing to much “ring,” or if the drum is too tubby. Move that mic until it sounds good. It’s much less about the plugins, EQ, compressors or how many subs are in the system. The Snare Drum- Use an SM57 Dynamic Hyper-Cardioid Microphone for classic Live sound. A sound guy noticed where I was pointing the mic and he suggested pointing more towards the edge of the head vs. pointing straight at the center. This placement gives you less of the attack of the beater striking the head and more of the body of the drum’s sound. Privacy Tools. Start here. No matter where you place the mic, you can reduce the amount of boominess from the drum by placing a pillow or blanket inside it. The sound was disproportionally all attack, no beef. What I did on my summer lockdown (new album). Have a hole in the front head that’s big enough for a mic to fit in. In summary, all these mics will do the job but some are more suited to certain scenarios over others. In a live setting, the biggest challenge most engineers face is getting the most gain without feedback, and the noise onstage and from the venue’s mechanical systems typically masks finer details like the noise floor of the mics. http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ultimatestudiosinc A great drum sound starts with a solid bottom end. Also, you'll have to purchase a kick drum mic stand. If you go to gigs a lot, you know how important your live kick drum sound is.. That’s why choosing the best kick drum mic you can afford can make a huge difference to your live sound.. Hello all, I thought it would be interesting to read people's thoughts on ideal bass drum mic placement for optimal sound. D112, B52, D6, AT250, they will all work just fine. The goal is to capture the full range of the instrument, which usually means having a mic on your kick drum, a mic on your snare, and at minimum an overhead microphone. Don't try to make the kick sound all modern and punchy and huge, with no hole the sound will be fat and warm and your mic in front of that with a little EQ and gate into a decent sound system will work just fine. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Heres my story. Best Kick Drum Mics for Live Sound: Comparison. Getting the best kick drum sound is a combination of careful mic choice and placement, along with a well tuned and played drum. If possible, use a mic specifically for kick drum — try an AKG D112, a Shure Beta52, or a mic that has a frequency response which favors bass tones, such as an Electro-Voice RE20, or a Sennheiser MD421. Placed 3 ” up-just off the edge-tilted towards the Center. The only kick drum microphone I know of that doesn’t require a stand is the Shure Beta 91, but other than that, almost all kick drum microphones really need a stand to get the best sound. In fact, you can find some large-diaphragm dynamic mics specifically designed to record kick drums. The kick and snare positions are really a matter of moving the mics until you achieve a sound that you like. I also realized that my personal tastes have changes since I first purchased that AKG bass drum mic many years ago. Near the outside head: If you have both heads on the drum, you can place the mic a few inches from the outside head.

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